'THE INFLUENCE OF BUSINESS PRIORITIES ON RADIO CONTENT IN UGANDA: A CASE STUDY OF RADIO TWO (Akaboozi FM)’

Title'THE INFLUENCE OF BUSINESS PRIORITIES ON RADIO CONTENT IN UGANDA: A CASE STUDY OF RADIO TWO (Akaboozi FM)’
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsKakooza, F
Abstract

ABSTRACT

 

The study ‘THE INFLUENCE OF BUSINESS PRIORITIES ON RADIO CONTENT IN UGANDA: A CASE STUDY OF RADIO TWO (Akaboozi FM)’ examines the extent to which business priorities affect radio content in Uganda. The study is premised on the background that commercial radio stations are influenced by business priorities, which results into a majority being engaged in entertainment-oriented programming that does not cater for citizenry enhancement or public participation in issues that affect them.

 

The study is situated within the Political Economy framework. Political Economy gives an evolutionary background to media commercialisation, highlighting issues of how media operate as industries through packaging content that attracts consumers for advertisers. However, critical political economy that was born out of Political Economy raises issues of media having a responsibility to serve the public in a commercialised media environment. The researcher examined radio programme content distribution to establish the percentage given to information compared to music, sponsorships and advertisements in programming. Radio personnel were interviewed to establish to what extent business priorities affect this programme content.

 

The researcher was interested in finding out the extent to which business priorities affect radio content therefore denying the public the right to diverse information. This involved finding out the nature of content and programming, how commercial radio contributes to the improvement of public welfare, whether the audience is involved in programme design, what time or space is given to local content compared to the adverts and music played and how business priorities are reconciled with the information needs of the audience in a commercial broadcast environment.


The research draws conclusions and proposes other areas of inquiry on how commercial radio can benefit the public, and policy makers with the aim of boosting radio’s contribution to issues that enhance public participation in society. The researcher recommends an evolving, generic programming format which is information based as relevant to Uganda.